Monday, October 29, 2018

5 Suggestions for Students that Cheat


As a teacher, discovering that students have or are cheating on assignments and tests is so frustrating. How will we ever know what they actually can do if they're cheating?! Here's 5 suggestions to tackle this important and common issue in our classrooms. 

5.) Make assignments meaningful
Research, and quite honestly common sense, tells us that we are more invested in our work when it is meaningful to us and we are invested in it. Is that the case with your students? Take some time and look over the homework, assignments, and assessments you are giving to your students: are they all multiple choice, repetitive sheets that require no emotional investment? If a child who loves art is asked to draw their response to a book chapter, don't you think they're more likely to do the assignment themselves, do it well, and be proud to show it off tomorrow?

4.) Teach about honesty and integrity
If students are taught about, and praised for, honesty and integrity directly, they then have the background knowledge and the concept of these loaded words in their repertoire. Us adults often assume that children know and understand these big words, and understand the repercussions of not acting as such, and not every student actually has that understanding without direct instruction. If you make it explicit, and teach it in the way you'd teach any skill, you can at least count on their understanding if it's not shown in your setting.

3.)  Stop obsessing over test scores
When kids are pressured, they cheat! Plain and simple. Stress does incredible things to the brain, including making a child who could ace a test in their sleep feel like they have no idea what's going on. When we make test scores and grades the "end all, be all" of school, kids result to cheating to help them get a leg up. 

2.) Honor student learning styles
Knowing student learning styles is one thing, and if you're a special educator, you're likely a master at this! But, often our students with IEPs aren't by our side under our direct instruction all day, as we want to our students to flourish in less restrictive environments, too. Help all of the providers on your student's team understand their learning preferences and HONOR THEM. If a child does not respond well to multiple choice tests, work with the teacher testing them to accommodate this for the child. Kids are WAY more likely to sneak a peek of their neighbors work if their learning styles aren't taken into consideration.
1.) Don't freak out
Cheating is a slippery slope and not one we want to go down, but when you freak out, things just continue sliding. Cheating is a behavior like any other behavior you would address, and has a root cause. Find it! Is the student acting on impulse? Lacking confidence? Not responding to the format of the task? Not invested? All of that? What is it?! Have a conversation with the child in a way that shows care as the driving force, and with some problem solving, I am confident that it's a behavior that can be addressed quickly.

How do you address cheating in your setting? Comment below!

Love,
Allie

Friday, October 12, 2018

10 Behavior Books for Teachers


There are SO many professional development focused books out there that it can be so difficult to know which ones are worth it to find at the library or buy on Amazon. Never fear! Here are the 10 behavior focused books that I would recommend to ANY teacher looking to better understand effective strategies to support student behavior. 



10.) More Creative Coping Skills for Children by Jessica Kingsley Publishers
This book has stories, craft ideas, meditations, games, and more all focused on developing healthy coping skills. It's categorized into each area (ex: anxiety, anger, depression) so it's incredibly user friendly and very easy to apply!


9.) Conscious Discipline by Dr. Becky Bailey
I love everything CD does, especially for elementary aged students! There is so much in the CD framework which you can really dig into on their website, but I love this book for learning. Bailey includes the "why" behind each component of the CD model and how to implement these concepts into your classroom. 



8.) Teaching Children to Care by Ruth Sidney Charney
This book is such a gift - there's no focus on discipline, but how to ethically set up proactive classroom routines and procedures so that students focus on the results of actions and process them effectively for real behavioral change. 


7.) Positive Discipline in the Classroom by Jane Nelson and Lynn Lott
I love the immediacy of this book - strategies and ideas that you can read and immediately implement! Makes it such a tangibly useful book that focuses on positives rather than punitive strategies that we all know don't actually work.


6.) Lost at School by Dr. Ross Greene
If you have followed me for any length of time, you know my deep love of this book and author! The concepts in this book completely shaped my classroom and allowed me to move away from punitive means of punishment and focus on problem solving and teaching missing skills. The best part of the book is the back - tangible check lists and question banks to help you get started in really getting to the root of challenging behavior. 


5.) Solving Thorny Behavior Problems by Caltha Crowe
This book breaks down common frustrating behavioral issues by using 5 named strategies. I love how this book focuses on collaborating with the student or group of students to solve the problems! I found this to be especially helpful for problems that affect the whole class. 


4.) Better than Carrots or Sticks by Dominique Smith, Douglas Fisher, and Nancy Frey
Restorative Practices is such a buzz word these days, but it's for good reason. This is one of the best books I have found to effectively explain these practices AND offer practical and applicable ways to introduce them into your school foundation. It's a super easy and quick read and would be an awesome whole school read. 

3.) Pushout by Monique Morris
This book completely changed my teaching. This book explores girls in juvenile detention centers - the stories of the girls, how they ended up incarcerated, and how school systems have perpetuated this cycle through the misunderstanding of black girls. Truly a book you MUST read and one you'll never, ever forget about. 


2.) Responsive School Discipline by Chip Wood
This is a great book for school leaders - it goes through simple school wide systems (really simple and ones that appear to often be over managed and over thought) that could proactively stop so many chronic behavior problems. I also love that part of the book focused on parent/family involvement, and ultimately buy-in, in the process of developing these systems.

1.) Fostering Resilient Learners by Kristin Souers
This book focuses on very tangible ways to create trauma-sensitive environments that help educators better understand the impacts of childhood trauma on student success, as well as create school environments that support students who have experienced trauma. The book is totally rooted in research and each chapter includes exercises and reflections so you can be really active while reading. The content is applicable for literally any age group. This is one of the best books I read to prepare me for teaching in a residential treatment facility.

What books would you add?

Love,
Allie

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Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Classroom Pets


For 5 years of teaching, I had the joy of having a rabbit in my classroom! I purchased Leonard the Rabbit for the soul purpose of being a classroom pet, and through the generosity of others, was able to upkeep all of his needs throughout the years. Why classroom pets you ask?

Having Leonard was such a gift to my special education classroom! Not only were my students motivated by spending time with Leonard, they were able to learn tangible skills and practice empathy through his presence on a daily basis. How?

Every week, a student was assigned the Leonard Helper which gave them some core duties: refresh his water bottle each morning, refresh his hay, give him a scoop of pellets, bring fruits and veggies back from the cafeteria for his afternoon snack, and clean his litter box 2x/week. This was easily the most complex and needed job in our classroom, so it was such a coveted job to get! No matter the prompting needs or levels of independence of the student, every child in my class would rotate into this job throughout our job rotations, unless they personally opted out. 

In our classroom, loud volume and unsafe environmental factors were frequently occurring, which often makes people wonder how I kept Leonard safe for so many years. I strategically placed Leonard's cage on a table in the back corner of the classroom. This made him out of the way, which was essential for behavior concerns as well as the fact that he can be distracting when eating or thumping around in his cage :) This location made it highly unlikely that it he would be unsafe. Additionally, if there was a classroom wide behavior that was affecting us, I would put Leonard in his travel carrier and move him to the principals office. We had an understanding that this would be the best for Leonard, and allow students to see how some behaviors affect even our classroom pet. This was previously addressed with my class, noting that he would not be able to stay in the classroom if it was unsafe or too loud for him, but that we'll try again tomorrow and he can return to the classroom then. 

On days when students were safe (no classroom wide unsafe situations), Leonard would be let out of his cage at the end of the day and would hop around on the rug. This was a HUGE motivator for the kids and easily their favorite part of most days.

I funded most of Leonard's supplies (litter, food, hay, toys, cage, water bottle, litter box, etc.) from the grant Pets in the Classroom and through projects from Donors Choose. Leonard stayed in the classroom every night and over the weekends by himself, which was never an issue. On longer weekends or breaks, I would pop in and check on him if I was in town, Leonard would either come home with me, or lovely colleagues or volunteers would care for Leonard. It takes a village!

Why a rabbit? I wanted my students to really experience responsibility and caring for someone/something tangibly, so I looked for a pet that would allow for this, as well as a therapeutic experience. Many of my students would pet Leonard while anxious, read to him, and use him to ease their big emotions. I don't believe this would be the same experience with every pet. If you're not ready for a rabbit or can't have one because of fur, don't fret! Fish, frogs, iguanas, lizards, guinea pigs, (and so much more) are REALLY fun to have in the classroom and can be awesome experiences for kids, too!

Do you have a classroom pet? Comment below and tell us about it!

Love, 
Allie